Solar Eclipse 2017

August 21, 2017 — Visible across North America

About the Solar Eclipse

A total solar eclipse happens when the moon completely blocks the sun. In 2017, a total solar eclipse will be visible in parts of the United States and Canadians will experience a partial solar eclipse. In Vancouver, the Moon will cover about 90% of the Sun's diameter. In Newfoundland, it will cover about 29%. It has been several decades since Canadians have seen an eclipse this significant.

How to safely view the eclipse

Looking directly at the Sun is dangerous and can cause long-term damage – that's still true during a partial eclipse.

While an eclipse can be enjoyable to observe, it is critical to know how to do it safely. Sunglasses, even dark ones, are not safe for viewing the eclipse. It is also important to never view the eclipse through the lens of a camera or telescope unless it is specifically equipped for observing the eclipse, with devices manufactured professionally for that purpose.

An option for watching the eclipse safely is to use a pin-hole camera. These can be made at home with simple materials. Another method is to buy certified solar glasses from a trusted source, such as a science store, museum or astronomy club.

What astronomers will learn from the 2017 eclipse

The 2017 eclipse will give astronomers the opportunity to make important observations about the sun and the space weather it generates. This has important implications for us here on earth.

The Sun produces solar wind, along with bursts of high energy radiation and particles, collectively known as "space weather." While the Earth is generally protected from space weather by its magnetic field, Canada's northern location, close to the magnetic poles, makes us particularly vulnerable to its effects. Space weather can degrade or disrupt many forms of the infrastructure we depend on, from long pipelines and hydro lines, to the satellites that support our cell phones and GPS, and communications that guide our aircraft.

For this reason, Canada invests in a broad-based program to monitor and forecast space weather, to enable us to predict and mitigate the impact of space weather events.

During the solar eclipse, astronomers get a unique opportunity to enhance their understanding of the Sun and the activities that influence space weather. As the moon blocks specific regions of the sun, astronomers can use radio telescopes to obtain more detailed observations of the various regions of the sun that emerge from the moon's cover and take detailed observations of various active centres on the sun, in particular.

During the eclipse, the NRC will use Canada's newest solar telescope, the Next Generation Solar Flux Monitor, to study the eclipse. This instrument is the result of a collaborative effort between the National Research Council, the Canadian Space Agency and Natural Resources Canada.

Learn more about how and why Canada invests in Solar Weather Monitoring.

Solar Eclipse 2017 – Partiality and time by province
Province Start Max End Partiality at Max
Alberta 10:24 11:34 12:47 72%
British Columbia 09:15 10:21 11:33 75%
Manitoba 11:47 11:47 14:10 64%
New Brunswick 14:36 15:47 16:53 58%
Newfoundland and Labrador 15:15 16:14 17:09 29%
Northwest Territories 10:55 11:42 12:30 32%
Nova Scotia 14:41 15:52 16:57 57%
Nunavut 13:11 14:22 15:29 46%
Ontario 13:00 14:17 15:32 61%
Prince Edward Island 14:41 15:50 16:54 55%
Quebec 13:26 14:40 15:49 61%
Saskatchewan 10:34 11:45 12:39 69%
Yukon 09:33 10:29 11:26 38%
Solar Eclipse 2017 – Partiality and time by city
City Start Max End Partiality at Max
Brandon, Manitoba 11:36 12:53 14:11 78%
Calgary, Alberta 10:20 11:33 12:50 81%
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island 14:32 15:50 16:54 55%
Edmonton, Alberta 10:24 11:35 12:49 75%
Fredericton, New Brunswick 14:35 15:47 16:53 58%
Halifax, Nova Scotia 14:42 15:52 16:58 58%
Iqaluit, Nunavut 13:30 14:20 15:09 30%
Kelowna, British Columbia 09:13 10:25 11:42 86%
Montreal, Quebec 13:21 14:38 15:50 66%
Ottawa, Ontario 13:17 14:35 15:48 69%
Penticton, British Columbia 09:13 10:25 11:42 87%
Québec, Quebec 13:26 14:39 15:49 61%
Regina, Saskachewan 10:30 11:46 13:04 79%
Saskatoon, Saskachewan 10:29 11:43 12:59 75%
St John's, Newfoundland and Labrador 15:29 16:29 17:24 43%
Toronto, Ontario 13:10 14:32 15:49 76%
Vancouver, British Columbia 09:10 10:21 11:37 88%
Victoria, British Columbia 09:08 10:20 11:37 91%
Whitehorse, Yukon 09:23 10:22 11:24 58%
Winnipeg, Manitoba 11:40 12:57 14:15 76%
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories 10:38 11:38 12:41 52%
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