ARCHIVED - Technology Transfer through People Transfer

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

April 05, 2005— Ottawa, Ontario

Jeffrey Murphy and his supervisor, Dr. Tyler Norsten, agree that exposing young researchers to various fuel cell projects across NRC is an effective
Jeffrey Murphy and his supervisor, Dr. Tyler Norsten, agree that exposing young researchers to various fuel cell projects across NRC is an effective

In the first month that Jeffrey Murphy worked at the NRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology (NRC-ICPET) he was able to transfer many ideas and techniques from his experience at the NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation (NRC-IFCI). At the same time, he acquired new skills and techniques that he transferred back to NRC-IFCI researchers.

The benefits of the NRC Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Program were recently augmented through the Simon Fraser University Co-op Program. Jeffrey Murphy, an undergraduate student at Simon Fraser University (Honours, Chemistry), did two co-op terms at the National Research Council: first at NRC-IFCI in Vancouver and then at NRC-ICPET in Ottawa. At NRC-IFCI, he gained a great deal of practical experience and knowledge in the characterization of polymeric materials for use in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), under the guidance of Dr. Steven Holdcroft and Ken Shi. This knowledge was transferred with him to NRC-ICPET when he began his second NRC co-op term.

Testing of a potential membrane material for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell
Testing of a potential membrane material for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

According to his NRC-ICPET supervisor, Dr. Tyler Norsten, "In the first month that Jeffrey worked here he was able to transfer many ideas and techniques that are not second nature to me. At the same time, he acquired new skills and techniques that he transferred back to NRC-IFCI researchers. He identified and drafted a detailed procedure on how NRC-IFCI researchers can improve their membrane casting capabilities by using technologies developed here at NRC-ICPET, based on inexpensive and readily available materials."

The arrangement was also a great experience for Murphy. "I think that most students would be eager to be given the chance to work at multiple institutes, on a variety of fuel cell-related projects. I like the fact that I am able to get to work sooner; not having to wait an entire week to be shown everything that I need to do, but instead to sort of pick up with the skills that I gained at NRC-IFCI and simply move on to new skills through this work term."

Membrane electrode assembly of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell
Membrane electrode assembly of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

Says Dr. Mike Hamilton, Director of the NRC Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Program, "The Program allows NRC institutes to be part of a broad scope of fuel cell research, promoting an open, frequent exchange of ideas and information between institute colleagues and among researchers in other institutes. This exchange moves the research forward and is helping to train the next generation of fuel cell researchers."


Recommended Links


Enquiries: Media relations
National Research Council of Canada
613-991-1431
media@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

Stay connected

Subscribe

Date modified: