ARCHIVED – Urban Infrastructure Rehabilitation v6n4-10

Volume 6, Number 4, Fall 2001

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IRC set to launch Municipal Infrastructure Investment Planning (MIIP) project

Managers of infrastructure assets, such as federal and provincial government departments, municipalities and universities, have to manage a diversified set of built assets, from complex underground networks to buildings, roadways, and parks. However, it is difficult to protect these assets from deterioration that can occur as a result of ageing, or climatic or geological factors. Shrinking funds for the repair of such assets compound the problem, with the result that some components of urban infrastructure systems are neglected and receive only remedial treatment.

FEDERAL, PROVINCIAL AND MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS HAVE TO MANAGE A BROAD RANGE OF INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS, INCLUDING ROADWAYS AND BRIDGES
FEDERAL, PROVINCIAL AND MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS HAVE TO MANAGE A BROAD RANGE OF INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS, INCLUDING ROADWAYS AND BRIDGES

 

Asset managers are faced with many challenges regarding when and how to inspect, maintain, repair and renew existing facilities in a cost-effective manner. There are few tools in the form of standards, guidelines, technical literature or computer software to assist them in their decision-making. While there are now many information technology (IT) "solutions" claiming to address the needs of organizations with mixed assets, it is difficult for organizations to evaluate these for suitability.

The National Research Council Canada and its collaborators in the MIIP project will develop and adopt a framework for organizing information and knowledge related to municipal infrastructure investment planning. The outcomes of the project will include:

  • surveys of IT tools currently available;
  • asset management case studies;
  • development of an IT framework for asset management;
  • development of generalized techniques for predicting deterioration of assets and determining maintenance project priorities;
  • guidelines and manuals that document the "state-of-practice" in strategic asset management.

For more information, visit http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/ui/bu/miip_e.html.

If you wish to participate in this consortium project, please contact Dr. Dana Vanier at (613) 993-9699, fax (613) 954-5984, or e-mail dana.vanier@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca.